Saturday, 12 April 2014

Blu-Ray Review - That Obscure Object of Desire

That Obscure Object of Desire is a mesmerising film about love, obsession, and the lengths to which people will go to seek what they truly desire. Adapted from the novel 'Le Femme et le Pantin' by Pierre Louys which was written in 1898, Bunuel's film isn't the first to tackle the subject matter but is undoubtedly the best. The title translates to 'The woman and the puppet' and those who have previously seen Bunuel's film will agree that this would be just as fitting a title as his chosen adage.

Following a strangely hypnotising opening sequence against a backdrop of palm trees and exotic music we are introduced to a mature gentleman who soaks a beautiful young lady from a stationary train with a bucket of water. After returning to his carriage the shocked onlookers seated beside him cannot hold back their curiosity and probe for the motive behind his actions. The story is then told through a series of flashbacks as we discover the connection between Mathieu and Conchita, the lady he soaked, and the build up to this bizarre event.

Forget (500) days of summer, That Obscure Object of Desire is the ultimate 'anti-romance', with the relationship that develops between our protagonists causing nothing but endless problems for the completely besotted Mathieu thanks to the devilish designs of  the beautiful but manipulative Conchita. Set against the backdrop of a series of terrorist attacks, Bunuel's film tackles politics alongside the love story and is one of those films that poses numerous philosophical questions but can also be enjoyed without reading too much into the deeper meanings.

Bunuel's masterstroke of using two actresses to play Conchita was apparently conceived accidentally, when the original actress scheduled to play Conchita (Maria Schneider) left the production. Carole Bouquet took on the role of the more timid and reserved side of Conchita's personality, with Angelina Molina showcasing her more promiscuous side. These performances combine with Fernando Rey's fantastic portrayal of a man with a rabid desire for that which he cannot have to elevate That Obscure Object of Desire to a near masterpiece that is well deserving of the lavish treatment of a Blu-ray release.

The Blu-Ray transfer is gorgeous to behold with the vivid colours bringing life to Bunuel's perfectly framed shots and the crisp sound transporting you to a host of exotic locations throughout the film. Interviews with cast members and an accompanying booklet are welcome additions to what is an excellent restoration and if you are a first-time viewer I guarantee that you will want to delve further into the film's history when the credits begin to roll.

Luis Bunuel's final film is a fitting end to an incredible career that still feels remarkably fresh despite first being released over 35 years ago. Fans of the director and newcomers alike are likely to be entranced by this intelligent and thought-provoking film, with the impressive transfer and a generous amount of extras making this disc a great addition to any collection.

4/5



If you like this you will enjoy these:
Before Sunrise
Brief Encounter
Blue is the Warmest Colour
(500) Days of Summer